Untitled is made up of 2124 hand thrown porcelain vessels featuring a cobalt blue self portrait. Each vessel was hand thrown over a period of two months. As they came off the wheel I didn't try and alter/perfect the shape of the vessel. Instead, I wanted to keep each vessel in their current state in order to capture a moment in time. These individual imperfections as a whole aren't noticeable until the viewer approaches the piece. These subtle imperfections reflect my sense of identity and personal pursuit for perfection. Everyone has flaws and it isn't until you get to a deeper level in a relationship, or closer to the subject matter that you notice these cracks and flaws. I used a stippling technique on each individual vessel that from up close has a perspective of scattered dots, but from afar the viewer receives a completed image of the artist. This shift in perspective creates alternating views depending on the angle and distance that the artwork is being received. I wanted to keep the facial expression neutral so the viewer can bring their own experiences to the subject matter. By doing this the viewer is interpreting the subject matter from their perspective and in a sense are critiquing the piece based on face value. The repetition of the vessels reflects my pursuit of perfection. By repeating the same vessel, I was guided by feel and sight to ultimately create a uniformed scale piece.

Untitled is made up of 2124 hand thrown porcelain vessels featuring a cobalt blue self portrait. Each vessel was hand thrown over a period of two months. As they came off the wheel I didn't try and alter/perfect the shape of the vessel. Instead, I wanted to keep each vessel in their current state in order to capture a moment in time. These individual imperfections as a whole aren't noticeable until the viewer approaches the piece. These subtle imperfections reflect my sense of identity and personal pursuit for perfection. Everyone has flaws and it isn't until you get to a deeper level in a relationship, or closer to the subject matter that you notice these cracks and flaws. I used a stippling technique on each individual vessel that from up close has a perspective of scattered dots, but from afar the viewer receives a completed image of the artist. This shift in perspective creates alternating views depending on the angle and distance that the artwork is being received. I wanted to keep the facial expression neutral so the viewer can bring their own experiences to the subject matter. By doing this the viewer is interpreting the subject matter from their perspective and in a sense are critiquing the piece based on face value. The repetition of the vessels reflects my pursuit of perfection. By repeating the same vessel, I was guided by feel and sight to ultimately create a uniformed scale piece.

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Throwing vessels for self portrait

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Arranging vessels for self portrait

Vessels ready to paint

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13260789_876551075801716_1335311787_n.jpg
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13248738_1604831863164431_756857319_n.jpg
 Untitled is made up of 2124 hand thrown porcelain vessels featuring a cobalt blue self portrait. Each vessel was hand thrown over a period of two months. As they came off the wheel I didn't try and alter/perfect the shape of the vessel. Instead, I wanted to keep each vessel in their current state in order to capture a moment in time. These individual imperfections as a whole aren't noticeable until the viewer approaches the piece. These subtle imperfections reflect my sense of identity and personal pursuit for perfection. Everyone has flaws and it isn't until you get to a deeper level in a relationship, or closer to the subject matter that you notice these cracks and flaws. I used a stippling technique on each individual vessel that from up close has a perspective of scattered dots, but from afar the viewer receives a completed image of the artist. This shift in perspective creates alternating views depending on the angle and distance that the artwork is being received. I wanted to keep the facial expression neutral so the viewer can bring their own experiences to the subject matter. By doing this the viewer is interpreting the subject matter from their perspective and in a sense are critiquing the piece based on face value. The repetition of the vessels reflects my pursuit of perfection. By repeating the same vessel, I was guided by feel and sight to ultimately create a uniformed scale piece.
IMG_0209.JPG
12930840_977126099050570_1696257340_n.jpg
 Throwing vessels for self portrait
13129225_1013324235382819_1461821726_n.jpg
 Arranging vessels for self portrait
 Vessels ready to paint
13256651_1749731275301741_1923423515_n.jpg
13328984_517088065143663_1013956643_n.jpg
13260789_876551075801716_1335311787_n.jpg
13285505_1717488268510596_85957104_n.jpg
13248738_1604831863164431_756857319_n.jpg

Untitled is made up of 2124 hand thrown porcelain vessels featuring a cobalt blue self portrait. Each vessel was hand thrown over a period of two months. As they came off the wheel I didn't try and alter/perfect the shape of the vessel. Instead, I wanted to keep each vessel in their current state in order to capture a moment in time. These individual imperfections as a whole aren't noticeable until the viewer approaches the piece. These subtle imperfections reflect my sense of identity and personal pursuit for perfection. Everyone has flaws and it isn't until you get to a deeper level in a relationship, or closer to the subject matter that you notice these cracks and flaws. I used a stippling technique on each individual vessel that from up close has a perspective of scattered dots, but from afar the viewer receives a completed image of the artist. This shift in perspective creates alternating views depending on the angle and distance that the artwork is being received. I wanted to keep the facial expression neutral so the viewer can bring their own experiences to the subject matter. By doing this the viewer is interpreting the subject matter from their perspective and in a sense are critiquing the piece based on face value. The repetition of the vessels reflects my pursuit of perfection. By repeating the same vessel, I was guided by feel and sight to ultimately create a uniformed scale piece.

Throwing vessels for self portrait

Arranging vessels for self portrait

Vessels ready to paint

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